The Biome and its people

The Biome and its people

The Amazon Biome has the greatest expanse of existing tropical forest in the world; it is home to the most abundant river on Earth, which measures around 6.500 kilometers long and has an unprecedented diversity of species and habitats.  It is estimated that one in every 10 species on the planet is found in the Amazon, where more than 40,000 plant species, 3,000 fish, 472 mammals, 428 amphibians and over 2 million insects have been reported.

The exploitation of natural resources has changed many of the zone’s natural dynamics.  Threats and pressures on this zone are growing every day, challenging the natural ecosystem and the 30 million people who depend on it.  It is estimated that this number includes 2.7 million indigenous people and 350 different ethnicities, 60 of which still live in isolation.  

SIGNIFICANCE 

This zone, spanning nine countries, plays an important role in maintaining the planet’s temperature and climate stability.  Hence, the need arises to create effective mechanisms for cross-border conservation beyond that result in government agreements to take action and consolidate the Amazon’s management and conservation. A clear example is the Tri-National Program for The Conservation and Sustainable Development of the Protected Areas Corridor of La Paya (Colombia), Cuyabeno (Ecuador) Güeppí (Peru).